Teresa Arêde, “Tríptico de Andas”

“Tríptico de Andas”, sculpture, 2020.
Detail of “Tríptico de Andas”, sculpture, 2020.
Detail of “Tríptico de Andas”, sculpture, 2020.
Detail of “Tríptico de Andas”, sculpture, 2020.

Materials: linen, wood, acrylic mono print.

Dimensions: 32cm x 90cm (individually)

Learn more about Teresa Arêde at www.teresaarede.com

Artist’s comment: The work submitted is a sculptural Tryptic inspired by the mural paintings of the church of São Tiago de Valadares, in Baião, Portugal. The images painted on the walls of the church are from the 15th century and represent odd angels and fascinating creatures: a cynocephalus devil, a two-faced animal with two horns, and a black bird with the head of a rooster and the beak of a goose. There is no oficial interpretation for the images on the wall – generally it has been linked to ideas of purgatory and hell. The existence of these apocalyptical animals beside angels and saints fascinates me. I wonder how the visual universe of hell is created and the way that evil is portrayed through time. I’m interested in the artificiality of these images, their inner world of dreams and nightmares in contradiction with their comical, almost cartoonish, look. I like to interpret them as a personification of evil, evil as the unknown; the animal that was never seen, but might exist, somewhere in the world of invisible things. For this artwork I wanted to show only the ‘debris’ of the reference images. The monoprints are made initially by painting onto glass, and then transferred to the linen. This process allows for the re-transformation of the painted image, pressed and smudged by force. The work is assembled in a droopy way, almost too light in its form to claim its ground. It explores a place of feebleness and frailty, that very much interests me, instead of fighting loudly for attention. I want these objects to be props for a play, part of the set or used actively by the characters; I want them to be messed around, touched and deformed. I imagine the magical creatures carrying these flags, representing their symbols and idols, advertising their religion of caos and movement – an attack to the stiffness of saints. So there it is, represented in the linen surfaces: the mess of wingless angles, headless saints and single horned mammals.